conservation

Exhibition: Stitching it up to 'Make It OK'

Authored by Devon Guild Crafts
Posted: Sat, 03/19/2016 - 6:09pm

Exhibition runs Saturday 19 March – Sunday 8 May Launch event 6 - 8pm Friday 18 March Venue: Devon Guild of Craftsmen Riverside Mill, Bovey Tracey, Devon TQ13 9AF

A touring exhibition including specially commissioned work by 5 artists who explore damage and repair, disease and healing, through stitch and other media.

Curator Liz Cooper launches a new touring exhibition entitled ‘What Do I Need to Do to Make it OK?’ at Devon Guild of Craftsmen this Spring. The title is taken from a talk by participating artist Dorothy Caldwell.

Is it a bird, is it a ‘plane…?

Authored by Paigntonzoo
Posted: Fri, 02/12/2016 - 3:07pm

No, it’s an otter! Olly the Otter, the world’s newest superhero, is one of the attractions at Living Coasts this half term. 2016 is the year of Super Sea Heroes at Torquay’s coastal zoo. Staff and visitors will be celebrating with a variety of activities that include crafts, talks and a superhero trail. Children will be able to create their own superhero mask, design their own Super Sea Hero and follow the Super Sea Heroes Trail if they pick up a trail sheet from the main entrance. Olly the Otter will be on hand from Monday to Thursday at 1.30pm.

Join Rangers working to help rare Dartmoor insect

Authored by Mary Youlden
Posted: Tue, 01/05/2016 - 5:37pm

Now that the festive celebrations are over, why not come and shake off the winter blues with a day of conservation work at Haytor. 

Dartmoor National Park Ranger Simon Lee will be working with volunteers on 10 January 2016, near the National Park Visitor Centre, to benefit the extremely rare bog hoverfly.

The day begins at 10.30 and finishes at 3.30 but you are welcome to come along for part of the day if you wish.

Devon beavers spark national conference

Authored by Mary Youlden
Posted: Thu, 10/22/2015 - 11:37am

When beavers appeared on the River Otter, most people welcomed their return to Devon. 

A similar public response was seen in response to Scottish reintroductions to the rivers Tay and Knapdale. They also sparked a debate about the potential benefits of restoring wildlife. 

For example, could beaver dams be a natural way to reduce flood risks? 

Could pine marten reintroductions help control unwanted grey squirrel populations?  And could peat bog restoration improve drinking water quality?

Illustrated talk: Conserving rare and endangered plants

Event Date: 
18/10/2015 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Old Duchy Hotel, beside the Dartmoor National Park Visitor Centre and garden, Princetown

If you love plants and are interested in plant conservation you will be interested in the lunchtime talk on Conservation Gardening, hosted by the Dartmoor Conservation Garden Project at Princetown, on Sunday 18 October.

PEG comes home to Living Coasts

Authored by Paigntonzoo
Posted: Mon, 08/10/2015 - 8:18am

The gorilla with wanderlust is back on home soil - for a time. PEG - Polar Explorer Gorilla - left Living Coasts in Torquay with HMS PROTECTOR, the Royal Navy's Ice Patrol Vessel, for her last deployment in October 2013.

She has since travelled to a range of South, North and Central American countries, along with the Caribbean, British Virgin Islands, South Africa, South Georgia and finally Antarctica, where the crew conducted surveying work and supported the British Antarctic Survey during the austral summer.

Dartmoor archaeologists need you!

Authored by Mary Youlden
Posted: Fri, 07/31/2015 - 9:54am

Help Dartmoor National Park Archaeologists and Rangers look after prehistoric stone rows on a two day conservation work project on 19 and 20 August 2015.

Dartmoor’s landscape is among the richest in western Europe in terms of its prehistoric archaeological remains.  Dartmoor contains the longest stone row in the world and has the greatest number of archaeological sites out of all the UK National Parks. In fact 60% of all stone rows to be found in England are on Dartmoor and 1/3 of all stone rows in the UK and Brittany are on Dartmoor.

Tiny moment of calm in a troubled land

Authored by Paigntonzoo
Posted: Sat, 06/06/2015 - 12:10pm

While Zimbabwe collapses economically and socially, dedicated conservationists continue their battle to save the country’s wildlife. This tiny antelope – an orphaned Sharpe’s grysbok – is being cared for at Dambari field station, near Bulawayo, after it was found orphaned near Hwange National Park.

Bird conservationist banks on success

Authored by Paigntonzoo
Posted: Thu, 04/30/2015 - 8:31am

A bird expert has travelled from South Devon to South Africa to help save an endangered African seabird. And within days of arriving, Living Coasts Senior Head Keeper Lois Rowell has found herself hand-rearing precious chicks.

Lois, an experienced bird keeper practiced in the delicate art of hand-rearing, is spending six weeks working with bank cormorants. She is helping SANCCOB, a leading marine conservation charity specialising in threatened seabirds such as the bank cormorant and African penguin. They are Living Coasts’ long-term partner in the country.

Zoo staff play Cupid for love birds

Authored by Paigntonzoo
Posted: Fri, 02/13/2015 - 1:19pm

These love birds at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park are doing what comes naturally, but there can be a lot of hard work behind the scenes to make sure rare species continue to breed.

Paignton Zoo curator of birds Jo Gregson holds the European Studbook for the wrinkled hornbill. “It’s my job to collect and collate information from other zoos on hatchings, matchings and dispatchings for the species and to make recommendations for pairings.” Which means that Jo gets to play cupid.

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