Mangalitza Pigs to make their debut at Devon County Show

Mary Youlden's picture
Authored by Mary Youlden
Posted Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 11:52am

Visitors to Devon County Show will be able to admire rare breed Mangalitza pig for the first time in the Show’s history. 

Mango, a Mangalitza and her litter of nine piglets, will be located in the outdoor pig feature next to the pig showing rings for the duration of the show which takes place from 16-18 May.

Mango’s owners, Amelia and Jason, who run an organic farm in Broadclyst with four Manga Sows and one Boar, are delighted to be attending.  Amelia said: ‘These are lovely pigs, highly social, docile and with strong maternal instincts. They are fantastic for the organic farming system as are good at foraging rough ground and produce an extremely high quality and healthy product at the end which is ideal for charcuterie.   I’m really hoping that by bringing Mango and her litter to the Show we can further raise awareness for this beautiful, hardy and woolly rare breed to continue to secure its future’.  

In 1933, the whole Mangalitza breed was almost lost with the total population world-wide down to less than 150 sows.  But thanks to the work of a small group of dedicated breeders the Mangalitza has been brought back from the brink of extinction and is now farmed on large units in Hungary and has been exported to North America as well as the UK.

Imported into the UK in 2006, there are 7 female lines and 3 boar lines established. There are three distinct types within the breed: Blonde, Red and the unique Swallow Bellied with its white underline. All three types are very hardy. The Swallow bellied Mangalitza was developed in the 1800’s by crossing the Blonde with the Black Mangalitza. Sadly, the Black pig became extinct in the 1970’s with the last known herd on the Serb islands in the Danube.

Once renowned as a Lard Pig capable of producing 70 litres of rendered fat, the Mangalitza has carved out new niche markets in forestry projects and the production of quality hams and salamis.